GOING HOME WITH YOUR BABY: Your Public Health Nurse Visit

Updated July 6th, 2022

While going home with your baby can be exciting, parents may have a lot of questions.  A visit from your public health nurse can help understand how to care for your new baby and yourself and answer any questions you might have.

Public health nurses offer health and wellness supports to mothers, newborns and their families. They can answer your questions about breastfeeding and infant feeding, sleeping, mental and physical wellness, safe relationships and parenting.

Your postpartum visit: What to expect

  • In many communities in Manitoba, a public health nurse will contact you in 2-3 days to check in and offer you a home visit.
  • If you have a midwife, your midwife will arrange your home visit.
  • In some communities, checkups for your baby and yourself may be at a clinic, health centre or nursing station.

At your home or clinic visit, the nurse or midwife will weigh and check your baby. They will provide education and support with feedings and caring for your baby and yourself. They can also discuss additional supports available in your community.

Your Growing Baby

Whether breastfeeding or formula feeding, a healthy newborn is expected to lose 7% to 10% of their birth weight in the first week of life. Most regain that weight within the first 2 weeks after birth. Some babies will lose more than 10% and may need extra feeding supports.

Your baby will be weighed in the first week to see how they are growing. The public health nurse or midwife will weigh your baby at your home or clinic visit.

If, at any time, you would like to have your baby’s weight checked you can contact your public health nurse or health care practitioner or in Winnipeg visit one of the clinics below.

DROP-IN WEIGHT CHECK LOCATIONS in WINNIPEG

ACCESS Downtown
640 Main Street
204-940-3638

ACCESS NorWest
785 Keewatin Street
204-938-5900

ACCESS River East
975 Henderson Highway
204-938-5000

Point Douglas Community Health Centre
601 Aikins Street
204-940-2025

ACCESS St. Boniface
170 Goulet Street
204-940-1150

ACCESS Winnipeg West
280 Booth Drive
204-940-2040

Seven Oaks Health and Social Services
1050 Leila Avenue
204-938-5600

Downtown Health and Social Services
755 Portage Avenue
204-940-2236

ACCESS Fort Garry
135 Plaza Drive
204-940-7100

 ACCESS Transcona
845 Regent Avenue West
204-938-5555

OUTSIDE OF WINNIPEG: Contact your public health nurse or your baby’s doctor to find out where you can have your baby weighed.  Check your health region’s website for more information on services available in your area.

Looking for more information on caring for your newborn and your family?

• Call your public health nurse, nurse practitioner, midwife, or your baby’s doctor.
• Contact Health-Links/Info-Santé at 204-788-8667 or 1-888-315-9257 (toll free outside Winnipeg).
• Visit the Healthy Baby website for information new and expectant parents.

If you have questions about breastfeeding

• Ask your public health nurse or midwife during your home visit.
• Contact your public health nurse or midwife.
• Read the Breastfeeding Your Baby pamphlet.
• See our Breastfeeding section.
• To find a breastfeeding support group or individual appointment in Winnipeg, visit Breastfeeding Resources
• Call the Breastfeeding Hotline: HealthLinks/InfoSanté: in Winnipeg call 204-788-8667, outside Winnipeg call toll free 1-888-315-9257 (press 2 for “other health concerns”).

Contact your public health nurse, baby’s doctor, nurse practitioner or midwife if baby has any of these issues:

• yellow tinged eyes or skin
• not interested in feeding
• very sleepy and you have problems waking your baby up to feed
• feeding less than 8 times per day (24 hours)
• does not feed for 4 to 5 hours
• has fewer than 3 wet diapers per day after 3 days
• does not have 1 or more loose greenish-brown stools in the first 1 to 3 days, then 2 to 3 dirty diapers each day after 4 days of age
• is crying all the time and cannot be comforted

If you think your baby is sick with a fever, cough, or has shortness of breath, they need to be seen by a doctor or nurse practitioner right away.